Make your own custom-made popup window!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore
[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

HELP! Mass carnage in your worm farm & other problems

HELP! Mass carnage in your worm farm & other problems

So you think your compost don’t stink? Good for you – that’s what you’re aiming for! But chances are at some stage during your composting journey you will doubt your prowess as a worm farmer and you may come up against a problem or two.

This blog is designed to give you the dirt on what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to worms and the sh!t that they produce. It will also endeavor to give you tips on how to navigate any landmines you might face. Don’t be afraid to dive on in – the earlier you open this can of worms the sooner you catch the worm.

The Healthy Worm

The key to healthy worms really comes down to the following 4 elements:

Food – the right stuff and the right amount
Aeration – enough to breathe
Temperature – neither extreme hot nor extreme cold
Moisture – not too wet, not too dry

Keeping these elements Balanced will keep your farm healthy and thriving! Worm composting is not a precise science and striking the right balance will be a matter of trial and error. You will soon get a ‘feel’ for it as you and your worms get to know one another. There are a couple of common problems that worm farmers are likely to face once in a while. If you do strike trouble, DON’T LOSE YOUR SH!T. These helpful troubleshooting tips should get you through it.

If Your Sh!t Stinks…..

If it’s in good condition, your worm farm will be relatively odour free. It will have a musty, earthy kind of smell, but it won’t be offensive and you shouldn’t be able to smell it when the lid is on. The most common reason that a worm farm smells is overfeeding. It is easy to overfeed your worms! Especially if you are still gauging what your worms are capable of consuming.

How to Fix That Sh!t

Don't feed the worms again until they have finished the last meal you fed them.

Cover food scraps with some damp scrunched up NEWSPAPER so that the scraps are not exposed to your worm farm’s lid.

If Your Worm Farm Is Attracting Pests……

Your worm farm will attract bugs, mites and flies. This is not usually a problem for the health of the farm itself – bugs will usually work with and eat harmoniously with your worms and may even improve their conditions. But they will become a problem for your household if they are not contained within the farm and become visible and unsightly around the farm.
Excessive flies and insects are also usually a result of overfeeding.  Follow the instructions for overfeeding outlined above.

If Your Worms Are Trying to Escape……..

You will have the odd worm try to ‘escape’ every now and again. This is not a problem – they generally return to their source of food.
If you notice your worms are trying to escape en masse, however, this is a problem. It is likely because the conditions in the farm have become BAD.
There are a few reasons why this would occur:

Overfeeding

Lack of air

The farm is too wet

The farm has become acidic

How to Fix That Sh!t

Aeration - holes in your design should provide ample air to the system as well as to provide the correct level of moisture for the farm, so the most likely cause for escaping worms will be overfeeding or excess liquid as a result of overfeeding. If you are worried that your worm farm isn't aerated enough, drill some holes in the sides or lid of your farm.

Remove any rotting food from your farm and gently AERATE the bedding with a garden fork.

Give the worms a few days to recover before feeding, and then introduce a small amount of food and monitor their consumption before feeding again.

Don't feed the worms anything high in acid (eg. scraps that contain citrus or vinegar).

Cover the food scraps with some dry scrunched up newspaper, which will absorb excess moisture.

If Your Worms Are Dying…….

If you notice carnage in your worm farm, it is likely that the conditions in the farm have become BAD ASS.
There are a few reasons this could occur:

Overfeeding

The farm is too wet

The farm is too dry

The temperature is too hot

The temperature is too cold

The design of your farm will rule out most of the above occurring.

For example, the surrounding bedding in your farm will moderate extreme hot and cold temperatures and insulate your worms. Aeration holes will also provide the correct level of moisture for the farm, which should ensure the farm is never too wet or dry.  But, sh!t happens to the best of us, and at some stage you may face wormicide in your farm.
If this does happen, DON’T DESPAIR you can bring your worms back from the brink (although this will involve getting your hands dirty).

How to Fix That Sh!t

If you are experiencing very hot or very cold temperatures, move your farm to a warmer/cooler space where it will be protected from the elements.

Remove any rotting food from your farm and gently aerate the bedding with a garden fork.

Give the worms a few days to recover before feeding them again, and then introduce a small amount of food and monitor their consumption before feeding again.

Download Our Free E-book for More Helpful Tips and a Comprehensive Guide to Wormfarming
Leave a Comment

YOU HAVE SUCCESSFULLY SUBSCRIBED! CHECK YOUR MAIL TO VERIFY